But Fire & Cane is a different proposition altogether. Glenfiddich Fire and Cane Tasting Notes The result is a much sharper, spicier version of Glenfiddich, which then mingles with the toffee notes offered by the rum casks. Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window), Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window). Fire & Cane is the fourth release in Glenfiddich's Experimental Series. By marrying peated whisky and malts matured in bourbon barrels, and then finishing in Latin rum casks, we created an exquisite whisky with campfire smokiness and toffee sweetness. Palate: Creamy texture with Demerara sweetness. This adds sweet caramel and toffee notes, contrasting the sharpness of peat smoke. Glenfiddich’s Experimental Series now has the 4th expression released, which is named ‘Fire & Cane’ that is explained by a ‘campfire smokiness and toffee sweetness’. After all, there’s plenty of rum finished whiskies, and there are peated whiskies beyond count. That’s true, but the combination of the two is quite unique (only Kura and the upcoming Ardbeg Drum that I can think of). Distillery: Glenfiddich Having said that, I do very much look forward to finding out what Glenfiddich’s Experimental Series will bring next! But at the same time I was also thinking what I stated in the first two paragraphs. Then again, my expectations were high… perhaps the quality of drams like Glenfiddich IPA and Project XX is doing Fire & Cane a disservice. ( Log Out /  ( Log Out /  Fire & Cane is the fourth instalment in Glenfiddich’s Experimental Series. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Frankly, I was hopeful about Glenfiddich Fire & Cane when I first heard about it since those were the days when I tried Balvenie 14 Peat Week Vintage 2003, which is an incredible peated whisky. ( Log Out /  Or is it just making the most out of NAS (Non Age Statement) thing? Experimental production has now become something and serious whisky connoisseurs started to question what the heck is happening in the whisky world. Now it seems like the distillers had a bold idea, but got cold feet half way through. What I decided after 3 days of tasting, smelling, photo shooting is that, with its price of $50 this bottle can be a fun bottle to sip as a daily peaty whisky, play around in cocktails for smart bartenders and finally of course a really good passageway whisky for those who keeps themselves away from peaty whiskies for now. The moment I first tried it, bottle behaved like an old dusty antique box and released the harsh peat. There’s a hint of smoke, but it leans more towards toasted oak than a roaring peat fire. If we talk about age, I would guess that this is around 8-9 years old and peat is mild around 5-8ppm (after distillation I mean). Glenfiddich did bring out a peaty whisky matured in ex-Bourbon casks (which they seldomly do) and finished it in Latin style Rum casks, which had a blend of the Caribbean and South American rums. There’s no smoke without fire, the proverb goes, but here there’s fire without much smoke. So the name is apt, but why is Fire & Cane experimental? Age: No age statement Change ), You are commenting using your Facebook account. I realise this is a strange thing to say for a smoky Speyside that received a rum finish to boot, but Fire & Cane is simply too sweet and almost too easy. abv: 43%. Yes. And that’s not necessarily a problem for your run-of-the-mill Glenfiddich, but this is the Experimental Series. Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Glenfiddich Fire & Cane is a bold fusion of smoky and sweet notes. Verdict: Did I like it? Finish: Not very memorable. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. It is always going to be an arguable topic but we can always taste and see which is good or not. The imminent peat attack milds down and blends with the sweet notes. Will they do it? For one, the distillery actually uses peated barley to achieve its smoky notes, rather than casks that previously held peated whisky. Palate ism fun to try, it is rich with rum notes and peated background with almost soft skinned tropical fruits. It's a peated whisky (the fire) which has been finished in barrels used to mature rum (the cane). Region: Speyside Nose: Sweet and fragrant, like (over)ripe orchard fruits, or apricots sprinkled with brown sugar. Change ). Could it be extraordinary with some older whisky? Notes of cinnamon and cloves give way to toffee and toasted vanilla. To top it off, this whisky then spent three months in rum casks, sourced from a variety of Latin American countries. Price: $50*. Glenfiddich 20 - Spirit of Speyside 1995 Cask, Lost Lantern American Vatted Malt Edition No.1, Bushmills 28 Year Old Cognac Cask Whiskey. May be? But Fire & Cane is a different proposition altogether. In Whisky by Whisky MonsterAugust 27, 2018Leave a Comment, Country – Region: Scotland – Speyside Distillery: Glenfiddich Type: Single Malt Age: NAS Cask: Bourbon, Latin Rum Cask Finish ABV: 43% Proof: 86 Price: $52. ( Log Out /  Glenfiddich did bring out a peaty whisky matured in ex-Bourbon casks (which they seldomly do) and finished it in Latin style Rum casks, which had a blend of the Caribbean and South American rums. Distiller: Glenfiddich Mash Bill: 100% Malted Barley Cask: ex-Bourbon and ex-Rum Age: NAS ABV: 43%. Peat and peppers are felt at the back palate blessed with molasses from the rum cask and Finish: Short to medium long finish with rum notes taking over and ending lively with sweet raisins. Most probably. Glenfiddich does have a rum finished 21 year old, and has in the past dabbled with peat in its Caoran Reserve. Charred oak and wood spice round off the palate, before a whiff of peat comes drifting in. Glenfiddich does have a rum finished 21 year old, and has in the past dabbled with peat in its Caoran Reserve. A novel concept is well and good, but I feel that Glenfiddich should’ve been more audacious about Fire & Cane. Glenfiddich Fire and Cane price, ABV, age and other details. Region: Highlands, Scotland. It’s nice to pair this dram with dark chocolate, to allow the bitterness of the cocoa to balance out the sweetness of the whisky, but I can imagine other pairings could work equally well. Let’s be honest! Verdict: Fire & Cane is an innovative Glenfiddich, but one that’s unfortunately a bit bland. Change ), You are commenting using your Twitter account. Is it really experimenting around taste and quality to achieve maybe a new style in whisky world? For one, the distillery actually uses peated barley to achieve its smoky notes, rather than casks that previously held peated whisky. Palate: More spicy than smoky, with a sweetness throughout. I think Fire & Cane is best described as a dessert whisky, sweet and indulgent, perhaps even a bit too much so. Nose: Initial attack of peat dissolves into sweet candied orange peels and very ripe tropical fruits.