Member Of The Board Of Advisors Sakhi for South Asian Women The panel also includes Superintendent of Schools. And they attended events in their hometown at Princeton University’s Department of African American Studies before venturing into downtown Princeton and later to Greater New York to interview people on the street about the effect race had on their lives. No matter where you live in the United States, no matter who you are, race has been relevant to your life.”. Sophomore Winona Guo started her nonprofit, Choose, with a friend Priya Vulchi, now a sophomore at Princeton University, while the two were still in high school. This item is available to borrow from all library branches. If you’re a Princeton student, chances are you’re part of the I’ve-never-crossed-Nassau-Street club, and, even if you have, you’ve probably only made it as far as Starbucks. If you can’t go, buy the book to read and then give to a classroom teacher. Word spread about the project after the pair posted recordings of those stories along with pictures of interviewees on the Choose site and started talking with mentors and experts about what more could be done. Princeton will never produce students “in the Nation’s Service and the Service of Humanity” if, in order to get there, students sidestep community service. They want readers to empathize and connect with the person they are reading about while also gaining a larger understanding about how past and current events or key statistics have shaped and continue to shape contemporary race relations. The second book, “Tell Me Who You Are,” was an expansion of the first, but in an effort to make it more representative of the country Guo and Vulchi took a gap year before college to travel to all 50 states and talk with more than 500 people about race — a journey they financed through personal fund-raising and corporate sponsorships. The partners have discovered that their mission is “something that is beyond the two of us,” she said. That text was largely funded by Princeton’s African American Studies Department after its chair, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., heard about the project from colleagues who’d met Guo and Vulchi at a university event. Some years, the arts scholars performed at the Kennedy Center. Together, they worked to overcome racism and inspire harmony through exposure, education, and empowerment. Post was not sent - check your email addresses! Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo choose to make a difference in overcoming racism. For both books, Guo and Vulchi paired the stories with research, statistics, and history to give readers a social and cultural context. The partners have discovered that their mission is “something that is beyond the two of us,” she said. Their most recent was published in June. Vulchi agrees. Deservedly, they have won prestigious awards, including NIOTPrinceton’s Unity Award and the Princeton Prize in Race Relations. Surely what helped Winona Guo to win was her amazing work, along with Priya Vulchi, as co-founders of Princeton CHOOSE. Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo are the authors of two textbooks. ['"An eye-opening exploration of race in America--and the ties that actually bind us"--', '"In this deeply inspiring book, Winona Guo and Priya Vulchi recount their experiences talking to people about race and identity on a cross-country tour of the United States. Word spread about the project after the pair posted recordings of those stories along with pictures of interviewees on the Choose site and started talking with mentors and experts about what more could be done. I came to know Guo and Vulchi as  board members of Not in Our Town Princeton,  Both made invaluable contributions and modeled how to work together as a team of two . It’s a simple thing, but it’s been at the heart of what Winona Guo ’22 has been doing for the past five years, documenting tales of race, culture, and identity in order to help change the ways racism is discussed — or not discussed — in the country’s K-12 classrooms. Then there is the one from the mother of Heather Heyer, who was killed by a car driven into a crowd of counterprotesters during the 2017 Unite the Right white-nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Another comes from an Indian man in Kansas who was told by a white stranger to “get out of my country” before being shot. About Tell Me Who You Are. Storytelling is important to character formation, so the way in which they wanted to ground [racial] experiences through stories seemed to be very, very important, particularly as a teaching tool in high schools and in elementary schools and middle schools.”.