Director of the Netherbow Arts Centre from 1983, Donald Smith became founding Director of the Scottish Storytelling Centre in 1996. We went during the Edinburgh Open Doors weekend event in September and were thus able to get in free of charge (look out for it each year! Quite an adventure, but my arms are tired from all the rowing! We present an exciting yearly programme of live storytelling performances, music, dance, theatre and literature, plus exciting visual arts, workshops and training events. It is warm and full of light and adapts to form niches and storytelling places via a great, hinged, “wall of stories”. Scottish Storytelling Centre, Edinburgh. Other than the relaxing cafe with its wood furniture, table service and delicious food i dont know what else the scottish storytelling  centre has to offer or what its about but definately worth a visit if just to relax with a cuppa and some food. • 1472-1517: new tenements built in front of existing townhouses to narrow and protect the Port. The following is a review specifically on the John Knox House museum which is a part of the  Scottish Storytelling Centre (last line edited for clarity and understanding).

The often missed Scottish Storytelling Museum is a great little gem. The Storytelling Court, possibly the most prominent room in the centre, has an informal layout: a minimalistic foyer leading on to the ceilidh room. You can check out their website or pop in to see upcoming events. Good specials on the board and a fairly solid menu. ), but it is normally only £4.25 for adults and is really fascinating. Attended a course here recently, I have walked up the Royal Mile many times and have never noticed this place before. I keep forgetting that I've been here... that's how few and far between I have reason to visit, which is a shame, because I really do love the space. Did I get this? Our light and airy Storytelling Court is open to the public, and includes a free child-friendly exhibition, Scotland's Stories, as well as a programme of temporary displays. Its curator, Dr. Donald Smith, is a treasure house of knowledge about the religio-political currents of that time and if you have any desire to dig beneath the surface of the history of that time in depth I encourage you to arrange a tour with him. I have been to the House a number of times and it is truly a gem of history (political and intellectual) specifically focused on Scotland's and particularly Edinburgh's turbulent Reformation era.

The John Knox House within the Scottish Storytelling Centre was great. When I first walked in there were about two families, that was fine. This site, combining the historic John Knox House with the adjacent former Netherbow Centre, marks the historic, mediaeval main gateway into Edinburgh.

The Centre is adjacent to the famous John Knox House on the Royal mile. 19th century: the Netherbow Port has been demolished and the Murray Knox Church is constructed, along with new tenements. The wee painting is an emblem that the Storytelling. The centre replaced the former Netherbow Arts Centre and was formally opened by Patricia Ferguson, Minister for Culture in the Scottish Executive, on the 1st June 2006. Storytelling was explored through an architect-led “Storytelling, Place and Building” Workshop.

This small museum is attached to another called John Knox House. What's not to like?! Its location at the Netherbow Port, incorporating the iconic, historic John Knox House and re-presenting the long-demolished Port’s historic bell, supports storytelling’s status as “gateway” art, while the project’s urban weave of Court, Close and Garden recovers the mediaeval townscape of Edinburgh whose creative and social interaction sparked its writers, artists and thinkers. history so I'm not entirely sure who he was, but he lived or was born here or something. From 1621 Netherbow Port housed the City Bell, which now hangs in the Scottish Storytelling Centre bell tower.

It has a massive windowed front looking right onto the Royal Mile.

I think everyone has a profound need to tell stories, and that can be in formal performances such as those here at the Storytelling Centre, or with a small gathering of friends over a glass of your favourite tipple.”. The centre replaced the former Netherbow Arts Centre and was formally opened by Patricia Ferguson, Minister for Culture in the Scottish Executive, on the 1st June 2006. The cake selection is wide, and very tempting. The storytelling centre is a great place if you like to listen to or tell by yourself all kinds of story. Major reconstruction of the house now known as "John Knox House" takes place around 1556. After sitting for about 10 minutes I swear the place being swamped by screaming, crying, shouting kids, and their mothers who were decidedly unimpressed at the lack of high chairs. This week Fairy Tale World Tour added a section on Northern Ireland and The Giant's Causeway. Tucked into the Royal Mile with a modern facade, you could probably walk right past it in the hunt for more tourist-tastic places to visit, but the Centre is well worth a stop. The skylights, opening the room to the heavens, diffuse sunlight into the Court. You can't really go wrong with the Scottish Storytelling Centre. If you get a chance, don't miss it. The Storytelling Court, possibly the most prominent room in the centre, has an informal layout: a minimalistic foyer leading on to the ceilidh room. Couple of downsides for this venue - first is that they struggled to get the temp right in the theatre - freezing on stage and roasting in the back row.