This book was a mixed bag for me. This is one of the books that really defined my life. As a computer security professional, I can really appreciate how far the technology AND the intel and counter-intel have evolved in the last 30 or so years. I adore the author. It is his first-person account of the hunt for a computer hacker who broke into a computer at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Amazing that so much has changed since the early 80's in terms of technology, yet the tactics for both hackers and security are fundamentally unchanged. Super fun book - the story of a sysadmin chasing a hacker during the early internet, but it reads almost like a thriller - fun and fast. He's used "bailiwick" 3 times already and I'm only 1/2 way through. Several of my colleagues got into this field or chose to pursue specific facets of it based on reading the book. Bradbury? It may be that he has a favorite author, who is up to 40 years older, who uses the words. We’d love your help. Would definitely recommend. It had every element I wanted. Honestly this was a refreshing and invigorating hacker tale, it scratched that rare hacker fiction itch that so often only non-fiction can really hit with its accuracy. I don't hold that against him because it happens to be appropriate for conveying a hint of what he felt as he went through this. But there are a hundred or so pages where he just (a) gets alerted that the hacker is active, (b) jumps out of bed, (c) starts a phone trace, (d) the phone trace fails for some reason, (e) he calls a bunch of federal agents and gets ignored. Great history lesson for system administrators and security experts, Reviewed in the United States on November 20, 2018. This gave me more insight into how computers need security and how easily they can be misused. The author really dragged the plot out. Anyway, it's a good book. This novel was written in 1989, and yet the U.S. Government agencies handling our personal information were to ignorant or in denial of the problem and refused to implement cyber security measures. I won't tell you whodunnit. Interesting account of the early days of hacking, when the Internet was in its infancy, Reviewed in the United States on June 27, 2013, The amazon review somewhat over-dramatizes this book, but it's still. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Each week I’ll review a few chapters of the book and we’ll tie Cliff’s experiences to modern themes in computer security. I think as I've gotten older and wiser and more discerning, and as technology has progressed, this book hasn't aged well. The technology has changed, but the crime and the chase have remained the same. Great book; fascinating times - sort of the Wild West days of computer networking. Beyond the hide and seek that unravels between t. Clifford narrates something as boring as tracking an intruder by patiently recording his every keystroke and simultaneously going through a frustrating ordeal of convincing all the three-lettered agencies to take action, scintillatingly and keeps our attention unwavering for 400 pages. And it's all true. Internet security is a major problem. The incredibly cat and mouse chase through what was then just the beginnings of the internet still kept me on the edge of my seat, remembering dial-up, dot matrix printers, and long d. The Cuckoo's Egg" by Clifford Stoll was fascinating the first time I read it in 1989, and when I saw it on one of the “books to read” lists on Goodreads, I eagerly reexamined it. Refresh and try again. Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2020. Not many people would have been persistent enough to stick with this. Reviewed in the United States on February 16, 2018. Instead, she waits for any kind of other bird to leave its nest unattended. My only complaint would be that the book gets a bit repetitive and monotonous in the middle. Why does the author, Cliff Stoll, choose to use "bailiwick" instead of "ball of wax"? This only occupied a small part of the end of the book. Retro hacker tale from the late 80s - and a good story, Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2020. Like him, I kept feeling like there was a breakthrough or resolution just around the corner, only to find myself strung along to a longer road ahead. Loved the references to Berkeley, the hacker chase, but most interestingly, it takes you back to an earlier time in computing (in 1989)- which I thought was a fascinating reminder of what things were like. In the 1980s, the nascent internet was mostly used by research scientists and the military. If you're a Unix sysadmin, like myself, you will recognize and emphathize with a lot of the concepts. It's fun to look up new (old) words, and learn the etymology. In turns out that the real-life cuckoo bird does not lay its eggs in its own nest. Today, the U.S. Government is doing better, but with our Washington politicians on their "lower taxes no matter what" roll and under funding all agencies, huge leaks are a ticking time bomb with our personal information. True story about about how Stoll, an astronomer, accidentally found a hacker in his computer system and tracked him down. Also met him at a security conference -- he gave a nice presentation. He mixes in some human interest elements and tells a good story. Cliff is an excellent storyteller and has done a great job sharing this true story. You have to read it yourself. Perfect! It was published in 1990. I am a bit younger than Cliff Stoll, but started using computers when I was very young (very late 1970s), so the tales of the technology really brought back memories. Would've been five stars but the conclusion was a bit anti-climactic after months of methodical build. Author Stoll leads us down the frustrating path of the early days of cyber theft and how he relentlessly pursued the attackers. But this is to be expected, as that's likely how any real investigation goes. Burrows? Even though it is over thirty years old, many of the concepts still apply. My only complaint would be that the book gets a bit repetitive and monotonous in the middle. Read honest and unbiased product reviews … Love his passion! Also, if I never hear the phrases “be serious” or “bailiwick” again, it’ll be too soon. ", reminding you how old this book is. You look at it sideways, and it smiles at you. The author concludes with a moral message about privacy, trust, and open source technology, which are even more important values nowadays. What I liked best about the book, is that Cliff is such a sympathetic person, which is described to the reader by little tales of him and his girlfriend ('sweetheart') sewing together, planting tomatoes or by him burning his shoes accidentally in the microwave. This one is a must read for all Unix and Linux fans! Excellent book about hackers and computer security told in a way that you do NOT have to be a geek to understand. The book is an excellent read for anyone interested in a good detective story or has any interests in computers. The first "infosec true crime" book I ever read, and thus possibly a major influence on my life's work to this point (although surely not so much as, The Cuckoo's Egg" by Clifford Stoll was fascinating the first time I read it in 1989, and when I saw it on one of the “books to read” lists on Goodreads, I eagerly reexamined it. Although it's consistently well-written, it is frustratingly slow at times. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in, An excellent, and entertaining light read, Reviewed in the United States on August 12, 2015. Asimov? I'm impressed with how diligently the author worked to track this guy down. Overall it was a great book. This gave me more insight into how computers need security and how easily they can be misused. Heinlein? Cliff Stoll gives a great narrative of a real life story of how a network of cyber espionage was detected, traced, and followed by a non-expert in cyber security. Cliff Stoll is an astronomer at Berkley who has been assigned to the IT department. He is best known for his investigation in 1986, while working as a systems administrator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, that led to the capture of hacker Markus Hess, and for Stoll's subsequent book The Cuckoo's Egg, in which he details the investigation. This is an absolutely riveting true account of computer hacking in the early days (mid 80s) when PCs had not yet become widely used in peoples homes, and if you used a computer it was probably at work, and most likely a dumb terminal hooked up to a mainframe made by Digital Equipment or IBM. If you don't know anything about computers, Stoll writes in a way that is more a conversation and does well to explain the more techy stuff. I just heard about this book the first time yesterday, Goodreads Employees Share Their Summer Reading Plans. For those of us familiar with Unix system administration, especially security-related work, many of the commands and techniques detailed in the book enhances our knowledge and enriches our appreciation for the operating system, as wells as stamping it with technical authenticity. This page works best with JavaScript. Hackers provide a glimpse into the future. That’s prison term stuff.”. It was non-fiction about computers and hacking that was written like fiction. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The Cuckoo's Egg: Tracking a Spy Through the Maze of Computer Espionage at Amazon.com. Verne? What I liked best about the book, is that Cliff is such a sympathetic person, which is described to the reader by little tales of him and his girlfriend ('sweetheart') sewing together, planting tomatoes or by him burning his shoes accidentally. I felt the ending was unsatisfactory, but that is because the real world is not Hollywood, and he was relating what happened in the real world. A great read.